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  #21  
Old February 5th, 2009, 04:46 PM
JStroop JStroop is offline
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Location: Hurst, TX, but every day I pretend it's somewhere in Colorado or British Columbia.
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So THAT'S where my nerf ball went! Mystery solved, at long last.
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Jeremy Stroop: Rides 88-96, Shows Fright Fests 89,90,91, Safety 97,99. Security 97-98. Hurst, TX
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  #22  
Old February 6th, 2009, 01:11 PM
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thecloak thecloak is offline
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I have to wonder just how many "items" were tossed into that thing just to see what would happen!
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81-82 Colonel's Cafe, 2008 HR - Temp, 2009 Rapids & Superman, 2014 Texas Giant, Boot Scootin' & Steam Train PIC, 2015 Steam Train. 2016-2017 Side 4 Supervisor, Steam Train. Head Trainer. Co-creator of the soon to be Johnson Creek Station Museum. 2018 back at the Railroad for my 9th season!
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  #23  
Old March 19th, 2009, 12:26 PM
Merv's Ragin Surf Merv's Ragin Surf is offline
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I had a meeting with David Keith about some changes to the ice house. We're looking at making smaller boxes that would fit under the augurs on 6 bin and not have to worry about that damn conveyor. That would really make working in the house a lot easier. I had to keep 4 people on the floor just to push ice down because the conveyor kept freezing up. IF that happens I see volunteers again to work in the house.
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  #24  
Old March 19th, 2009, 03:18 PM
JStroop JStroop is offline
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Man... that would really change everything.

I like ol' David Keith. I figured he would have retired by now.
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Jeremy Stroop: Rides 88-96, Shows Fright Fests 89,90,91, Safety 97,99. Security 97-98. Hurst, TX
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  #25  
Old January 7th, 2010, 12:52 PM
Merv's Ragin Surf Merv's Ragin Surf is offline
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Snow blowing is over, and it really was a lot easier this year. The mechanics revamped the baggers so we could run ice from 6 bin straight into the boxes. We ran both sides at once several times. The only thing that would have made it easier woulda been a electric pallet jack, it took 2 people to push the boxes out the door, and cleanup only took about 10 minutes. Another advantage was that we could fill up the boxes at the end of the day and store them in the house, this let us come in a little later the next day since the boxes were alreay full. Since the hill is at Music Mill now we just forklift the boxes to the hill and don't have to worry about them falling out of the trucks. We only dropped one hoe in the augur this year, Poston went nuts and took it to David Keith who then had the welders modify the hoes so if we dropped it again it wouldn't fall into the augur, changed the weight on them by about 30lbs. I don't know of any good stories this year, if something happened nobody told me.
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  #26  
Old January 31st, 2010, 09:11 AM
pyrotechnic thunder pyrotechnic thunder is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JStroop View Post
It's PCS that they all went to work for. Joe Ellison wound up there after he left the park, then PCS (now Caremark, I think) became Six Flags Graduate School. There were a lot of former Six Flaggers out there. I applied for a job there as a security/safety guy myself. I wound up not getting the job, which was fine by me - they wanted more of a security guy with safety as a throw-in. I was more of a safety guy with security as a throw-in.

I've got a ton of snow blowing stories. It seems like I was always put in charge of it as a supervisor. That was about the time I started to hate it. Before I was a supervisor, I loved doing it. It was weird to see it go through its evolution.

When I first started, we used giant blocks of ice that we bought from Redi-Ice, and they left out in a refrigerated trailer out at the old gate 7 (now where the Batman Ride is.) We'd fill the flatbed trucks up with the blocks of ice and take them down to the hill where we fed them into the ice chopper, which had the open teeth of the chopping mechanism expose so that anyone who wasn't careful was going to turn an exposed body part into a red sno-cone. There were lots of injuries that season. Mostly due to blocks falling on fingers or toes, or two blocks smashing fingers between them.

The next year, they decided that they wanted to save money by using the icehouse ice. So the process was to fill the flatbed trucks up with ice, drive the truck to the hill, and shovel the ice into the snow blower. That was a very labor-intensive process, which we were able to somewhat offset by tilting the truck bed so the ice would feed down into the blower. This was somewhat less labor intensive, but was difficult to control, and resulted in a lot of ice landing on the ground and not so much into the feeder. So Rusty tasked Ryan Weir with coming up with a way to do it more efficiently. The next year, we becan to use the boxes.

The boxes were a pretty brilliant solution, the only better one I could think of would have been to build an ice-maker with a rake bin right there in the circle of empty space between the hill and the que (in the old snow hill spot.) At first, we used wooden doors for the bottom of the boxes. That presented some odd problems... once the ice started melting, the wood doors would swell up and they'd be near impossible to get out. So we had the carpenters give us about 3/4 less width on either side of the handle to give us room to wiggle it back and forth to get it out. Then we started using a metal pipe as leverage, but that wound up tearing up the wood on the handles. Also, we didn't bounce the boxes at first. We just shoved a rake or broom up in the hole to loosen up the ice, and some times climb up onto the box to push the last of the ice out. Then someone came up with the brilliant idea to bounce the boxes. That made life a lot easier. The next season, we started using metal doors on the boxes, which solved a lot of problems.

Next episode.... Worst Day Ever.
I think I am really dating myself but I can remember the first snow hill....it was built on top of the old GT cars track....and I can remember getting the ice in blocks. Redi-Ice usually had one and sometimes two refrigerated trailers parked outside the back gate by the old games warehouse filled with 300 pound blocks of ice standing on end, sometimes it was a race to get the trailer unloaded before the refrigeration unit ran out of fuel. And do i remember all the injuries...lots of smashed fingers and toes...either from dropping the block on your toes as you laid them down in the trailer to load them onto the flatbed truck....or having your fingers between two blocks as they shifted around in the back of the truck. I remember the ice chipper for the blocks....huge teeth....and i remember a certain supervisor who tried to slow and stop the machine by grabbing the belts...end result was an amputation of the tip of his finger.

I remember when we started using the ice house...filling the truck and then boxes and driving them around to the hill.
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